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Tom Hiddleston’s butt may have its own hashtag, #Hiddlesbum, but the actor doesn’t strip down just so his impressive backside can trend on social media.

In his new indie High-Rise, he plays a doctor who moves into an apartment building that turns out to be full of all sorts of crazy neighbors and shenanigans. “He moves into the building to get away from the entanglements of real life,” Hiddleston told E! News at the Tribeca Film Festival. “He’s excited by the anonymity of the building.”

But he learns his privacy isn’t so sacred when a neighbor (Sienna Miller) spies him sunbathing in the nude. And yes, that’s when we get a peek at Tom’s buttocks.

The scene is actually in the 1975 novel that the movie is based on, High-Rise by J.G. Ballard. “And [director] Ben Wheatley and Amy Jump, the screenwriter, thought it was very important to do so I had not problem doing it,” Hiddleston said.

Miller laughed when we told her about #Hiddlesbum. “That’s so funny,” she said.

But she admits that nudity on camera is never comfortable for most actors. “[Tom] doesn’t love it but he’s also very good at his job and professional so if the script calls for it, he will get his Hiddlesbum out,” Miller explained.

High-Rise is available on VOD, iTunes, and Amazon Video on April 28 followed by a theatrical release on May 13.

Hiddleston was teased about #Hiddlesbum while appearing late last month on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert while talking about him dropping his pants on his new AMC series The Night Manager.

Hiddleston told Colbert that he’s OK with nudity because he “trained” for it while studying acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. “There’s no class in #Hiddlesbum at RADA,” he joked. “Actually…there’s always a moment in training where you’re given a role where you have to be comfortable with nakedness. I think they see it as part of the training.”

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Tom Hiddleston talks about the movie:

It’s been eleven years since Peter Jackson’s King Kong, and in Hollywood years that’s far too long for us to go without a reboot. Next out of the gate is Kong: Skull Island, that plans to kickstart a brand new franchise centring on the chest-beating simian. Initially it was set to be a prequel to the 1933 original but those plans were scuppered in favor of something different.

While we’re still relatively in the dark about its plot, former cast member JK Simmons let slip that certain scenes were set in the 1970s – which would definitely be considered ‘different’ in Kong lore. If that’s still the case, it’s unconfirmed but according to Tom Hiddleston, who’s playing an unknown lead role, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. “I don’t want to spoil too much,” he tells EW, “But it’s a whole new reconception of the mythology. It essentially follows a group of disparate travelers and explorers and soldiers who travel to an undiscovered island in the South Pacific ”

Okay, so far, so same…

“And it’s set in a time period where you could conceive that there are still undiscovered places on the Earth. What they find on the island is surprising, and then every character has a very different response to it. It’s going to be spectacular and epic, but also the human drama is kind of interesting as well.”

Alright, now it sounds as if there’s no chance this is set in the 1970s. It’s still encouraging to hear that it’s going to be “spectacular” and “epic” because who would want a Kong movie that’s a quiet character drama?

Well, one thing’s for sure: Legendary Pictures plans to sync this new King Kong franchise with its other monster franchise Godzilla in the near future. That 2014 reboot was set in the present day so it’s anybody’s guess how this pair will meet. Might there be time travel involved? No, no, they wouldn’t do that. Would they?

Directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts, and starring Tom Hiddleston, Brie Larson, Toby Kebbell, Tom Wilkinson, John Goodman, Samuel L. Jackson and John C. Reilly, Kong: Skull Island opens in the UK and US on March 10, 2017.

Via:GamesRadar

The MTV Movie Awards brought a first look at Kong: Skull Island last night, here’s the video:

Brilliant final episode of The Night Manager tonight. Here are Screen Captures. Really hope they renew for a second season, even if there is no second book.


Here some events from this week where Tom is promoting “I Saw The Light” at the Apple Store Meet the the Actor, SiriusXM Radio, and I Saw the Light Screening in New York and After Party


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Finding that broken feeling took a while, but when it came, just before midnight on the Louisiana set of “I Saw the Light,” Tom Hiddleston’s voice crawled into Hank Williams’ words as the blues played out slow and mournful to the hushed tune of a single guitar.

Hiddleston’s rendition of “Your Cheatin’ Heart” comes toward the end of writer-director Marc Abraham’s biopic, which opens Friday. A troubled man and a music legend, Williams, who died at 29 in 1953 after recording 30 Top 10 country music hits, left an indelible mark on American culture. Hiddleston, a British actor best known for his villain Loki in Marvel movies, said he felt the sting of torment and the weight of legacy in each song.

“It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done,” said Hiddleston, who had to reinvent his inner musical rhythms and raise the pitch of his baritone to embody Williams’ tenor. “The moment I signed on I understood my duty to him and his family. You’ve got no choice but to throw your whole soul at it.”

Hiddleston traveled to Nashville and was coached by Rodney Crowell, a Grammy-winning country musician who introduced the actor not only to Williams’ music but to the work of bluesmen such as Jimmy Reed and Howlin’ Wolf. The two worked on blues chord progressions and how to get Hiddleston, whose British training had made him metronomically precise, to give the music air by hanging back slightly off the beat.

“Rodney used to say, ‘We’re shaking the Englishman out of you,'” said Hiddleston, who recalled their collaboration the other day as a white patio curtain lifted in the breeze and the faint sound of traffic drifted in from the Hollywood Hills. “I couldn’t have made it without Rodney. I needed a guide through the woods.”

Williams’ up-tempo songs, like “Hey, Good Lookin’,” and “Honky Tonkin’,” vibrated with coy fun and desire. But it was sparse and poetic ballads that earned Williams, who suffered back pain and was addicted to alcohol and drugs, the nickname “Hillbilly Shakespeare.” His voice could sound as if it had been through a storm; a bit of hurt pressing against the dawn with Alabama-inflected syllables that could curl a note back into a phrase or vanish.

In the years before his death, Williams, a former shipyard worker, seemed a man recounting defeats and laying bare his demons in a potent and beguiling mix of masculinity, stoicism and vulnerability. That raw plaintiveness transcended country music and inspired singers and songwriters including Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Tony Bennett, Norah Jones and Bruce Springsteen, who once said he wanted to crack Williams’ musical code to understand its “beautiful simplicity and its darkness and depth.”

In the film, Hiddleston as Williams, well into a night of boozing, explains to a writer the mood he evokes in songs such as “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”: “Everybody has a little darkness in ’em,” he says. “Now, they may not like it. Don’t wanna know about it. But it’s there. … I’m talking about things like anger, misery, sorrow, shame, and they hear it. I show it to ’em. And they don’t have to take it home.”

Much of Williams’ singularity and heartbreak resonated in his voice, which could shift from somber to what Crowell called a “post-vaudeville yodel” that tested singers who tried to emulate him.

“Credit has to go to Tom’s work ethic. He’s a dedicated artist,” Crowell said of the 35-year-old Hiddleston. “Hank Williams was a yodeler and a blues singer, which is basically from the knees down and the neck up. Tom had to get hold of the mechanics of projecting his voice as a yodeler does. He had to break out of the trained Shakespeare actor chest voice and into the yodel. It’s a very difficult thing to master.”

The yodel warbled through “Lovesick Blues,” a song Crowell said was “a job for anybody.” Hiddleston did 62 takes of it in one day, which the actor said “felt like swimming in the ocean through seaweed and finally I was in clear water.” But the melancholy in “Your Cheatin’ Heart” was tough to personify. Hiddleston lived with the song for months but the magic didn’t arrive until late on a cold Friday night in Shreveport, La., after a long week of shooting.

“My voice sounded good and technically it was pleasing, but Rodney said he couldn’t hear the pain in it,” Hiddleston said. “He kept re-stating that it needed to be more painful, more aching, more mournful, more yearning.”

While the crew was setting up the shot, Hiddleston walked into a backyard. “The challenge of it was very solitary,” he said, “and I just went back inside and did it.”

Hiddleston did two takes with Crowell playing guitar off camera. The scene captured a man’s pain over a love lost and was an eerie glimpse at a life in spiral. After the last note was struck, Hiddleston, slipping into a Southern accent, remembered Crowell saying: “That’s it right there. You ain’t going to do no more. I’m going back to my hotel.”

“Tom put his butt on the line,” said Crowell, adding that he wanted to do the song live on the set to distill its intimacy. When Williams recorded it in 1952 he was months away from death. “It was one of the most beautiful performances Williams ever did. We had to capture the poignancy of that moment.”

Williams was rough, brash and unadorned. His early death, like those of other musicians including Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain and Amy Winehouse, left behind astonishing work and endless conjecture at what might have come with age. Williams wore his flaws in public, showing up drunk at performances and forcing the Grand Ole Opry, the pinnacle he aspired to for years, to drop him. He died of heart failure in the back seat of his Cadillac on his way to a New Year’s Day concert in Canton, Ohio.

“Hank was one of those people who lived without a safety net,” Hiddleston said. “They make compelling artists because they stand at the edge of a cliff and look down and are unafraid of the fall. That’s why they’re so captivating. But I do have that safety catch. The difference between me and him is I will step back.”

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